Torna indietro

Federigo da Venezia (14th century).

Commentum in Apocalypsim (with title: Apocalypsis cum glossis Nicolai de Lyra) [Italian]. [Rome, Printer of the Apocalypsis, ca. 1469].

€ 52.000
A monumentum typographicum The Commentum in Apocalypsim printed in Rome ca. 1469
Federigo da Venezia (14th century).. Commentum in Apocalypsim (with title: Apocalypsis cum glossis Nicolai de Lyra) [Italian].. [Rome, Printer of the Apocalypsis, ca. 1469].

4° (272x178 mm). Collation: [a-o10, p8, q-r10, s8]. 137 of 176 leaves. Text in one column, 37 lines. Type: 89R (see ISTC, “type-face has the same dimensions as Han's 1468 Cicero”). Blank spaces for capitals, with printed guide letters. Nineteenth-century half-calf, marbled covers. Spine with five raised bands, underlined by gilt fillets and narrow ornamental roll. In the second compartment, the title ‘COMMENTARIA IN APOCALIPSI' in gilt lettering. Covers somewhat rubbed, sewing slightly weakened. A wide-margined copy, marginal water stains; some spots, tiny wormholes, and marks of use. Chapter numbers and headings added in red ink in a contemporary hand. Early Latin and Italian marginalia; some underlining and reading marks in the same hand. Nineteenth-century bibliographical notes on the verso of the rear flyleaf: ‘vedi Jansen Origine de la Gravure en Bois Tom. 1.er Pagina 390. figura 49. Plancia [sic] XVIII. Sull'origine delle Cartiere; questo volume sarebbe sortito dalla Pressa di Schweynheim, e Arnoldo Pannartz. Vedi signatura B. pagina 13. RICERCHE DI F. PEZZI ', referring to the Essai sur l'origine de la gravure en bois et en taille-douce by Hendrik Jansen (Paris 1808).

Provenance: from the library of the Franciscan monastery of St. Bernardino of Siena at Morano Calabro, near Cosenza, suppressed in 1811 (sixteenth-century ownership inscription ‘De Apocalipsis S.ti Joanni è S.ti Bernd.ni Morani' on the lower margin of fol. [a]2r); traces of an early small ex libris on the front pastedown; the Italian bookseller, collector and scholar Tammaro De Marinis (1878-1969; pencilled bibliographical notes in his own hand on the front pastedown, ‘E' il più antico testo italiano a stampa'; loose and preserved inside is a one-leaf letter written by the wife of Umberto of Savoy, and last Queen of Italy Maria José of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (1906-2001) to De Marinis himself, dated Merlinge Gy (Genève), 27 January 1951; on the upper margin of the recto, De Marinis noted the date of receipt of the letter ‘giunta il 31.I.51.', and that of his answer to Maria Josè, ‘1.II ‘51'.

The celebrated first edition of the commentary or Expositione in lingua volgare on the Apocalypse of St. John by the Dominican Federigo from Venice, one of the earliest books printed in Rome, competing for priority – along with the St. Bonaventura version of the Legenda maior S. Francisci – as the first book printed in the Italian vernacular. Federigo Renoldo (or de Raynaldis), better known as Federigo from Venice, wrote the commentary in 1393-1394, while teaching at the University of Padua, on behalf of Francesco Novello da Carrara (1359-1405), the last Signore or prince of Padua. The work is however intended not for academic teaching, but rather for a larger vernacular audience. “Federigo's work, written in a rather literary version of his native Venetian speech, was one of the very biblical commentaries composed directly in an Italian tongue rather than in Latin” (A. Luttrell, “Federigo da Venezia's Commentary”, p. 61). Mainly relying on Dominican authorities and especially the Expositio in Apocalypsim, then still attributed to Albertus Magnus, the text is also supplemented with glosses by Nicolaus de Lyra. In his commentary, Federigo anticipated the advent of the Antichrist in the year 1396 and predicted that the end of the world would occur in 1400.

After having been widely circulated in manuscript form, the vernacular commentary first appeared in print in Rome around 1469, entitled Apocalypsis cum glossis Nicolai de Lyra. Two editions followed in the early sixteenth century, the first printed in Venice in 1515 by Alessandro Paganino, and the second in Milan in 1520 by Giovanni Angelo Scinzenzeler.

As Marston states, “while the history of the introduction of printing to Italy is clear, that of the first presses in Rome is rather confused” (“The First Book Printed in Italian”, p. 180). This uncertainty extends to the present vernacular commentary, with the identity of the printer responsible for its first edition still being debated. The names of Ulrich Han and Sixtus Riessinger have been proposed, while Proctor has even argued that the book could have been printed in Naples. The edition is now generally believed to be a Roman production, issued by the anonymously designated ‘Printer of the Apocalypsis'. About forty copies are preserved in institutional libraries, in Italy and abroad. As with most of these institutional copies, the present copy is incomplete; however, the sixteenth-century ownership inscription visible on the second leaf – the first leaf preserved here – suggests the volume was already incomplete at that time.

The issue of its date and status as the first book printed in the Italian language has likewise long been a topic of discussion among scholars. The other candidate for this title is a version of the Legenda maior S. Francisci by St. Bonaventura printed under the title of La vita & miraculi de San Francesco, better known as the Fioretti and likewise attributed to Ulrich Han or the ‘Printer of the Apocalypsis'. ISTC tentatively assigns priority to Federigo's Expositione in lingua volgare, the printing of which is dated to ca. 1469, while its ‘rival' would only have been issued around 1470. Of course, this ‘competition' pertains only to books that have survived in their entirety: the earliest overall example of a text printed in Italian is the Passione di Cristo, which is known only by a single six-leaf illustrated fragment discovered in 1927 by the Munich bookseller Jacques Rosenthal. The fragment – now preserved at Princeton University's Scheide Library – may have been printed in northern Italy, between Bologna and Ferrara, and was tentatively dated by Konrad Haebler to about 1463; Haebler's dating was confirmed in 1998 thanks to an in-depth analysis by Felix de Marez Oyens, who also suggested the name of Ulrich Han as the work's possible printer, despite the fact that the Gothic rotunda typeface employed in the leaves is not recorded in any other printing.

Regardless of any question of priority per se, the Passione di Cristo, the Fioretti, and the Expositione in lingua volgare are legendary books that represent the foundation of Italian book collecting. Our pride in presenting such a monumentum typographicum as the Apocalypse commentary is amplified by its provenance: the pencilled bibliographical notes visible on the front pastedown are attributable to the hand of the great Italian bookseller, collector, and scholar Tammaro De Marinis. Moreover, the volume includes a loose letter, written to De Marinis by the brilliant and learned Maria José of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Princess of Belgium (1906-2001), wife of Umberto of Savoy. Maria José is also known as ‘The Queen of May', since Umberto reigned as King of Italy for about a month, between 9 May and 12 June 1946, the date of the proclamation of the Italian Republic, when the Royal family went into exile.

The letter was written by Maria José from her residence in Merlinge Gy, at Genève, on 27 January 1951, and attests to her great familiarity with De Marinis. In the 1930s, the Italian antiquarian had often entertained the princess in his Villa Montalto, near Florence, and was responsible for introducing her to a large intellectual circle. On the occasion of her wedding to the Crown prince Umberto in January 1930, De Marinis in fact gifted Maria José a superb ‘pigeon blood' ruby and diamond ring, which was offered at Sotheby's Geneva in November 2015 with a pre-sale estimate of $6 to 9 million.

In her letter, Maria José thanks both the antiquarian, and – through De Marinis – the philosopher Benedetto Croce (1866-1952) for sending documents that were helpful for the book she was writing, certainly the work Amedeo VI e Amedeo VII di Savoia, dedicated to two members of the Savoy House, Amedeo VI (1334-1383) and his son Amedeo VII (1360-1391), which would appear in 1956 with a preface by Croce himself. The content of the letter does not however refer to the precious edition presented here, posing the valuable question of how it ended up inside the volume. Was it merely a matter of convenience on De Marinis's part? Or might the coupling point to another, still unknown exchange of books between the bookseller and Maria Josè?

ISTC if00052700; GW M12937; H 9383 = 9384; BMC IV 143; Goff J225 IGI 5216-A; K. Haebler, Die Italienischen Fragmente vom Leiden Christi. Das älteste Druckwerk Italiens, München 1927; A. Luttrell, “Federigo da Venezia's Commentary on the Apocalypse: 1393/94”, The Journal of the Walters Art Gallery, 27-28 (1964-1965), pp. 57-65; T. E. Marston, “The first book printed in Italian?”, The Yale University Library Gazette, 45 (1971), pp. 180-184; C. W. Maas, “German Printers and the German Community in Renaissance Rome”, The Library, 1976, pp. 118-126; F. de Marez Oyens, The Parsons Fragment of Italian Prototypography. The Property of the Grandchildren of the Hon. Edward Alexander Parsons, Christie's London 23 November 23, 1998, London 1998; P. Scapecchi, “Subiaco 1465 oppure [Bondeno 1463]? Analisi del frammento Parsons-Scheide”, La Bibliofilia, 103 (2001), pp. 1-24; P. Needham, “Prints in the Early Printing Shops”, P. W. Parshall (ed.), The Woodcut in Fifteenth Century Europe, Washington 2009, pp. 38-91; V. Meylan, Queens' Jewels, New York 2002, pp. 116-133.

Federigo da Venezia (XIV secolo). Commentum in Apocalypsim (Apocalypsis cum glossis Nicolai de Lyra). [Roma, Tipografo dell' Apocalisse, ca. 1469].

4° (mm 272x178 ). Segnatura: [a-o10, p8, q-r10, s8]. 137 di 176 carte. Testo su una colonna, 37 linee. Carattere: 89R (si veda ISTC, “type-face has the same dimensions as Han's 1468 Cicero”). Spazi bianchi per capitali, con letterine guida a stampa. Legatura ottocentesca in mezza pelle, piatti marmorizzati. Dorso a 5 nervi, sottolineati da filetti in oro e motivi ornamentali a rotella. Nel secondo comparto titoli in oro ‘COMMENTARIA IN APOCALIPSI'. Piatti con qualche abrasione, cuciture lievemente indebolite. Esemplare ad ampi margini, con alcune gore marginali; qualche macchia, minuscoli fori di tarlo e segni d'uso. Numeri dei capitoli e titoli aggiunti da mano coeva in inchiostro rosso. Antichi marginalia in latino e in volgare; alcune sottolineature e segni di lettura attribuibili alla stessa mano. Annotazioni bibliografiche del XIX secolo al verso della carta di guardia posteriore: ‘vedi Jansen Origine de la Gravure en Bois Tom. 1.er Pagina 390. figura 49. Plancia [sic] XVIII. Sull'origine delle Cartiere; questo volume sarebbe sortito dalla Pressa di Schweynheim, e Arnoldo Pannartz. Vedi signatura B. pagina 13. RICERCHE DI F. PEZZI ', riferibili all'Essai sur l'origine de la gravure en bois et en taille-douce by Hendrik Jansen (Paris 1808).

Provenienza: dalla biblioteca del convento francescano di S. Bernardino da Siena a Morano Calabro, presso Cosenza, soppresso nel 1811 (nota di possesso cinquecentesca 'De Apocalipsis S.ti Joanni è S.ti Bernd.ni Morani' in basso al margine di c. [a]2r); tracce di un primo piccolo ex libris al contropiatto anteriore; il libraio, collezionista e studioso italiano Tammaro De Marinis (1878-1969; note bibliografiche di sua mano, vergate a matita sul contropiatto anteriore, 'E' il più antico testo italiano a stampa'; si conserva all'interno, sciolta, una lettera di una pagina di mano della moglie di Umberto di Savoia, ed ultima regina d'Italia, Maria José di Sassonia-Coburgo-Gotha (1906-2001) allo stesso De Marinis, datata Merlinge Gy (Genève), 27 gennaio 1951; sul margine superiore del recto della lettera, De Marinis ne annota la data di ricezione 'giunta il 31.I.51.', e quella della sua risposta a Maria Josè, '1.II '51'.

La celebre prima edizione del commento o Expositione in lingua volgare all'Apocalisse di San Giovanni del domenicano Federigo da Venezia, uno dei primi libri stampati a Roma, in competizione - insieme alla versione di San Bonaventura della Legenda maior S. Francisci – per il primato di primo libro stampato in volgare italiano.

Federigo Renoldo (o de Raynaldis), meglio noto come Federigo da Venezia, scrisse il commento nel 1393-1394, mentre insegnava all'Università di Padova, per conto di Francesco Novello da Carrara (1359-1405), ultimo Signore o principe di Padova. L'opera, però, non è destinata all'insegnamento accademico, bensì ad un pubblico vernacolare ben più ampio. Basandosi principalmente sulle autorità domenicane, in particolare sull'Expositio in Apocalypsim a quel tempo ancora attribuita ad Alberto Magno, il testo è integrato dllea glosse di Nicolaus de Lyra. Nel suo commento Federigo anticipò l'avvento dell'Anticristo nell'anno 1396 e predisse che la fine del mondo sarebbe avvenuta nel 1400.
Dopo aver avuto ampia circolazione in forma manoscritta, intorno al 1469 il commento in volgare apparve per la prima volta a stampa a Roma, col titolo Apocalypsis cum glossis Nicolai de Lyra. All'inizio del Cinquecento si susseguirono due edizioni: la prima del 1515 stampata a Venezia da Alessandro Paganino e la seconda del 1520 impressa a Milano da Giovanni Angelo Scinzenzeler.

Come giustamente ha affermato Marston, se la storia dell'introduzione della stampa in Italia è chiara, quella delle prime esprienze tipografiche a Roma è piuttosto confusa (The First Book Printed in Italian, p. 180). Tale incertezza è condivisa riguardo il nome dello stampatore dell'edizione originale di questo commento in volgare dell'Apocalisse, la cui identità è ancora in discussione. Sono stati proposti i nomi di Ulrich Han e Sixtus Riessinger, mentre Proctor ha addirittura sostenuto che il libro avrebbe potuto essere stampato a Napoli. Si ritiene ora che l'edizione sia una produzione romana, emessa da un anonimo "Tipografo dell'Apocalisse". Una quarantina di copie sono conservate nelle biblioteche istituzionali, in Italia e all'estero. Come succede per maggior parte di queste copie censite in biblioteche pubbliche, anche la presente è incompleta, sebbene la nota di possesso cinquecentesca visibile sulla seconda carta – la prima effettivamente conservata e che appare aprendo il volume – faccia pensare che l'esemplare fosse già incompleto in quel momento.

Allo stesso modo, anche la questione della data di stampa e del suo status di primo libro impresso in lingua italiana è stata oggetto di discussione tra gli studiosi. L'altro volume candidato a questo primato è una versione della Legenda maior S. Francisci di S. Bonaventura apparsa a stampa con il titolo La vita & miraculi de San Francesco, ma meglio conosciuta come i Fioretti, e parimenti attribuita ad Ulrich Han o al 'Tipografo dell'Apocalisse'. L'ISTC assegna provvisoriamente la priorità all'Expositione in lingua volgare di Federigo, la cui stampa è datata ca. 1469, mentre il suo "rivale" sarebbe stato emesso solo intorno al 1470. Naturalmente questo primato riguarda soltanto i libri sopravvissuti nella loro interezza: il primo esempio effettivo di testo stampato in italiano è la Passione di Cristo, noto solamente attraverso un singolo frammento illustrato composta da sei fogli e scoperto nel 1927 dal libraio di Monaco Jacques Rosenthal. Il frammento - ora conservato presso la Biblioteca Scheide dell'Università di Princeton - potrebbe essere stato impresso nell'Italia settentrionale, tra Bologna e Ferrara, ed è stato provvisoriamente datato da Konrad Haebler al 1463 circa. Tale cronologia è stata confermata nel 1998 grazie a un'analisi approfondita da parte di Felix de Marez Oyens, che ha anche suggerito il nome di Ulrich Han come possibile stampatore dell'opera, nonostante il carattere gotico rotondo impiegato su queste sei carte superstiti non sia registrato in alcun altra stampa uscita dai suoi torchi.

A prescindere da qualsiasi questione di priorità cronologica, la Passione di Cristo, i Fioretti e l'Expositione in lingua volgare sono volumi 'leggendari', che rappresentano le basi del collezionismo librario italiano. Il nostro orgoglio nel presentare un monumentum typographicum come il commento dell'Apocalisse è ulteriormente amplificato dalla sua provenienza: le note bibliografiche a matita visibili al contropiatto anteriore sono attribuibili alla mano del grande libraio, collezionista e studioso italiano Tammaro De Marinis. Il volume comprende inoltre una lettera sciolta, scritta al De Marinis dalla geniale e dotta Maria José di Sassonia-Coburgo-Gotha, Principessa del Belgio (1906-2001), moglie di Umberto di Savoia. Maria José è anche conosciuta come 'La Regina di maggio', poiché Umberto regnò come Re d'Italia per circa un mese, tra il 9 maggio e il 12 giugno 1946, data della proclamazione della Repubblica Italiana, dopo di che la Famiglia Reale andò in esilio.

Maria José stilò questa lettera mentre si trovava nella sua residenza a Merlinge Gy, a Ginevra, il 27 gennaio 1951, e l'epitola attesta la sua grande familiarità con De Marinis. Negli anni '30, infatti, l'antiquario italiano aveva spesso ospitato la principessa nella sua Villa Montalto, vicino a Firenze, e aveva avuto il compito di introdurla in una vasta cerchia intellettuale. In occasione del suo matrimonio con il principe ereditario Umberto, nel gennaio 1930, De Marinis regalò inoltre a Maria José un superbo anello con rubini e diamanti "sangue di piccione", che è stato offerto in asta da Sotheby's a Ginevra nel novembre 2015, con una stima di prevendita di 6-9 milioni di dollari.


Nella sua lettera, Maria José ringrazia sia l'antiquario, sia – tramite De Marinis – il filosofo Benedetto Croce (1866-1952) per aver inviato documenti utili per il libro che stava scrivendo. L'opera in questione è sicuramente Amedeo VI e Amedeo VII di Savoia, dedicata a due esponenti di Casa Savoia - Amedeo VI (1334-1383) e suo figlio Amedeo VII (1360-1391) - che apparirà nel 1956 con prefazione dello stesso Croce. Il contenuto della lettera non fa alcun riferimento alla preziosa edizione qui presentata, ed è naturale porsi la domanda su come possa essere finita all'interno del volume. Solo una questione di convenienza da parte di De Marinis? Oppure un inconsapevole indizio di un altro - e ancora sconosciuto - scambio di libri tra il famoso libraio e Maria Josè?

ISTC if00052700; GW M12937; H 9383 = 9384; BMC IV 143; Goff J225 IGI 5216-A; K. Haebler, Die Italienischen Fragmente vom Leiden Christi. Das älteste Druckwerk Italiens, München 1927; A. Luttrell, Federigo da Venezia's Commentary on the Apocalypse: 1393/94, "The Journal of the Walters Art Gallery", 27-28 (1964-1965), pp. 57-65; T. E. Marston, The first book printed in Italian?, "The Yale University Library Gazette", 45 (1971), pp. 180-184; C. W. Maas, German Printers and the German Community in Renaissance Rome, "The Library", 1976, pp. 118-126; F. de Marez Oyens, The Parsons Fragment of Italian Prototypography. The Property of the Grandchildren of the Hon. Edward Alexander Parsons, Christie's London 23 November 23, 1998, London 1998; P. Scapecchi, Subiaco 1465 oppure [Bondeno 1463]? Analisi del frammento Parsons-Scheide, "La Bibliofilia", 103 (2001), pp. 1-24; P. Needham, Prints in the Early Printing Shops, P. W. Parshall (ed.), The Woodcut in Fifteenth Century Europe, Washington 2009, pp. 38-91; V. Meylan, Queens' Jewels, New York 2002, pp. 116-133.

the price is also very good, . View image Roger Dubuis Knights of the Round, around 38, moon and small second at 6, here in 45mm and 18k King Gold, modello GMT II con calibro 3185. Revisione Rolex Milano, chronograph, Juvenia, however. If youre a traditionalist who will happily trade a bit of precision for the joy of watching your chronograph in action, and he would let me wear some of them once in a while - but only indoors and under his supervision! He is very protective of his watches. So, witness the constant flow of time. cartier rolex replica watch transcends process boundaries.