Torna indietro

[Benedetto Bordone]. Hieronymus, Sophronius Eusebius (347-420).

Commentaria in Bibliam. Ed: Bernardinus Gadolus Venice, Johannes and Gregorius de Gregoriis, de Forlivio, 1497 - 25 August 1498.

€ 14.500
One of the finest woodcut borders of the fifteenth century
[Benedetto Bordone]. Hieronymus, Sophronius Eusebius (347-420).. Commentaria in Bibliam. Ed: Bernardinus Gadolus. Venice, Johannes and Gregorius de Gregoriis, de Forlivio, 1497 - 25 August 1498.

Two volumes, folio (317 x 209 mm). Collation: I. A8, < 2-3 >6, < 4-6 >6, a-c8, d10, e8, f6, g-h10, i8, k6, l-u8, x-y6. A-R8, S10, T-Z8, AA-BB8, CC6. II. DD-HH8, DDD-EEE8, FFF-HHH6, DDDD-GGGG6, HHHH4, II8, KK-LL6, aa-ff8, ll-ss8, tt10, vv-zz8 (yy8 blank), &&12-1, aAA8 (fol. aAA blank), BBb-NNn8, OOo6, PPp8, QQq6, a8, b-c6, AA-BB6. Complete with 845 leaves, including quire BB6, often lacking. Text in one column, 48-61 lines. Type: 20:170G, 32*:83G, 39:82R. Large woodcut printer's device on fols. PPp8r and QQq6r. White-on-black woodcut candelabra border and fourteen-line animated initial depicting St. Jerome on fol. aAA2r. Woodcut decorated, and animated initials throughout, mostly on black ground. Modern brown morocco, over pasteboards. A good copy, some dampstaining and toning, some leaves spotted, inkstains and some soiling, small repairs to blank corners and wormhole repairs in vol. 2, beginning of preface of Isaiah soiled with top and bottom margins renewed, final leaf soiled and chipped with small repair to blank area. Marginalia in several hands.

Provenance: partially effaced ownership inscription from Mantua in vol. 2; acquired from the antiquarian bookshop of Leo S. Olschki, Florence, 28 December 1965.

The Venetian edition of Jerome's fourth and fifth-century commentaries accompanying his Latin translation of the Bible, edited for the de Gregoriis brothers by Bernardinus Gadolus and containing, on fol. aAA2r, a re-use of one of the finest woodcut borders of the fifteenth century: the white-on-black woodcut border drawn and cut by Benedetto Bordone (or Bordon, 1450/55-1530) for the Herodotus issued by the same press in 1494.

The exquisite all'antica border – described by Essling as a “magnificent frame on a black ground, so justly praised […] the most perfect type of decorative art applied to the ornament of the book” – includes birds, vases, pilaster-forms, and vegetal and candelabra motifs. It is often connected to the marvelous woodcut border likewise attributed to Bordone and included in the Lucian of 1494, which Bordone himself also edited and which represents the first official appearance of the Paduan native's name in Venice. Both borders exhibit the same delicate refinement and inventiveness arrived at through the highly skilled miniaturist's adaptation of illumination techniques to woodcut design, an achievement that helps make him one of the most remarkable figures in the multi-faceted world of the Venetian book.

The present border is, however, larger and more elaborate, with two large white-ground insets: at the top, one inset shows a satyr or horned faun preparing to sacrifice a goat, while at the bottom the other is understood to represent the celebrated episode of Hercules at the Crossroads, when the demigod must decide between Vice or Virtue. Here Hercules is seated on a marble bench with a dead or sleeping child at his feet, surrounded by a variety of female figures – a clothed figure on the right with a turreted head, a nude figure on the left with a thread connecting a mask on one end to a rectangular structure on the other, and another clothed figure kneeling in front and potting a plant. The intriguing Hercules vignette is a variation on a drawing by Bernardino Parenzano of ca. 1490, held at Christ Church College. In turn an interpretation of an antique relief, the drawing in fact aligns with the less popular episode of The Madness of Hercules (in which the demigod kills Megara and their children together, believing them to be enemies while under the influence of vengeful Hera) and is replete with complex symbolism related to both the myth and to general reflections on human nature (D. Fasolini, “Le linee della follia”, p. 196). In his reworking and simplification of the drawing, Benedetto Bordone brings the scenario back in line with the more famous (and commercially viable) Crossroads episode while retaining some of this enigmatic imagery. Adding further to the curious design is the inclusion of the initials S.C./P./I. on a rectangular structure (formerly an altar in the Parenzano drawing), which Donati has connected to an engraver from Cesena: S[tephanus] C[esenas] P[eregrini] I[ncidit].

Given the vague association between the border imagery and St. Jerome's commentaries, and especially in light of the woodcut's reuse from the Herodotus, the border's inclusion seems to have been considered less in terms of its thematic fitness than as a beautiful decoration in itself. The image included within the border is more apposite to the main text. While in the Herodotus this woodcut shows the Greek historian crowned by Apollo, in the present work, the border, which appears on the first text-page of the Expositio in Psalterium, now surrounds a fourteen-line animated initial with St. Jerome at his desk. Numerous other ornamental initials also appear throughout the text, some with paired dolphins and mostly on black grounds. The effective use of classical themes in relation to the Bible speaks to the changing nature of readers and books in the Renaissance, and no single artist was better able to attend to those changes than Bordone. By the early sixteenth century, he was among the most esteemed and sought-after designers of all printers active in Venice, and had a special link to the Aldine Press: erudite and versatile, he and Aldus shared clients, friends, and patrons, and above all a life-long passion for the ancient world and its artful transmission to their contemporaries. In this regard it is notable that single elements of Bordone's decorative vocabulary find close parallel in ornamental headpieces and initials used by Aldus between 1495 and 1499, and many scholars share the opinion that Bordone was the principal designer of the 172 woodcuts in the famous Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, the pinnacle of Aldus's printing career.

The present copy is exceptionally complete with the Registrum, usually lacking in recorded copies.

ISTC ih00160000; GW 12419; H 8581*; BMC V, 350; IGI 4729; Goff H-160; Essling 735 (Herodotus) and 1170; Sander 3386; L. Donati, “Di una figura non interpretata di Stefano Pellegrini da Cesena”, Studi riminesi e bibliografici in onore di Carlo Lucchesi, Faenza 1952, pp. 45-52; C. Furlan and L. Rebaudo, “‘Hercules tristis insaniae poenitentia'. Su un disegno all'antica di Bernardino da Parenzo”, Annali della Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. Classe di Lettere e Filosofia, s. IV, 7 (2002), pp. 321-341; L. Armstrong, “Benedetto Bordon, ‘Miniator', and Cartography in Early Sixteenth-Century Venice”, Eadem, Studies of Renaissance Miniaturists in Venice, London 2003, 2, pp. 591-643; D. Fasolini, “Le linee della follia. L'iscrizione CIL VI, 21757 in un disegno del Christ Church College attribuito a Bernardino da Parenzo”, Sylloge Epigraphica Barcinonensis (SEBarc), 15 (2017), pp. 173-197.

[Benedetto Bordone]. Hieronymus, Sophronius Eusebius (347-420). Commentaria in Bibliam. Ed: Bernardinus Gadolus. Venezia, Johannes and Gregorius de Gregoriis, de Forlivio, 1497 - 25 agosto 1498.

Due volumi, folio (mm 317 x 209). Segnatura: I. A8, < 2-3 >6, < 4-6 >6, a-c8, d10, e8, f6, g-h10, i8, k6, l-u8, x-y6. A-R8, S10, T-Z8, AA-BB8, CC6. II. DD-HH8, DDD-EEE8, FFF-HHH6, DDDD-GGGG6, HHHH4, II8, KK-LL6, aa-ff8, ll-ss8, tt10, vv-zz8 (yy8 bianca), &&12-1, aAA8 (c. aAA bianca), BBb-NNn8, OOo6, PPp8, QQq6, a8, b-c6, AA-BB6. Completo delle 845 carte, compreso il fascicolo BB6, spesso mancante. Testo su una colonna, 48-61 linee. Carattere: 20:170G, 32*:83G, 39:82R. Grande marca tipografica silografica alle cc. PPp8r e QQq6r. Bordura silografica con decorazioni a candelabra e iniziale alta 14 linee, raffigurante San Gerolamo, a c. aAA2r. Capilettera silografici, anche figurati, lungo tutto il testo, per lo più a fondo nero. Legatura moderna in marocchino marrone, su piatti in cartone. Esemplare in buono stato di conservazione, alcuni aloni di umidità, alcune carte macchiate, macchioline di inchiostro e tracce di polvere, interventi di restauro agli angoli e sui margini di alcune carte nel volume 2, inizio della prefazione al libro di Isaia con segni di sporco e margini rinnovati, ultima carta con tracce di polvere e piccoli restauri, sempre nelle aree bianche esterne allo specchio di stampa. Marginalia di mani differenti.

Provenienza: nel volume 2 nota di possesso parzialmente cancellata e riconducibile alla città di Mantova; acquistato dalla libreria antiquaria di Leo S. Olschki, Firenze, 28 dicembre 1965.

L'edizione veneziana dei commentari di Girolamo - risalenti al IV e V secolo - a corredo della sua traduzione latina della Bibbia, curata per i fratelli de Gregoriis da Bernardinus Gadolus e contenente, a c. aAA2r, una delle più belle cornici silografiche del Quattrocento: si tratta del riuso della bordura silografica a fondo nero disegnata e tagliata da Benedetto Bordone (o Bordon, 1450/55-1530) per l'Erodoto stampato dallo stesso tipografo nel 1494.

La squisita bordura all'antica – descritta da Essling come una “magnificent frame on a black ground, so justly praised […] the most perfect type of decorative art applied to the ornament of the book” – comprende uccelli, vasi, lesene e motivi vegetali, candelabri. Essa è spesso collegata alla meravigliosa cornice silografica ugualmente attribuita a Bordone e inclusa nel Luciano del 1494, di cui lo stesso Bordone fu anche curatore, e che rappresenta la prima comparsa ufficiale del nome dell'artista padovano a Venezia. Entrambe le bordure mostrano la stessa delicata raffinatezza e l'eccezionale carica inventiva raggiunta - da parte del miniaturista altamente qualificato - attraverso l'adattamento delle tecniche della miniatura alla pratica dell'incisione su legno. Un risultato che contribuisce a rendere Bordone una delle figure più straordinarie nell'universo multiforme della produzione libraria veneziana.

La bordura del volume che qui presentiamo è più ampia ed elaborata rispetto ad altri esempi, con due grandi riquadri a fondo bianco: in quello in alto è raffigurato un satiro o fauno cornuto che si prepara a sacrificare una capra, mentre all'interno di quello in basso l'altro è rappresentato il celebre episodio di Ercole al bivio, con il semidio chiamato a decidere tra il vizio o la virtù. Qui Ercole è seduto su una panca di marmo, con un bambino morto o addormentato ai suoi piedi, circondato da una varietà di figure femminili: una a destra, vestita, con la testa turrita, l'altra a sinista, nuda, nell'atto di stringere un filo che collega una maschera a una struttura rettangolare dall'altra. Una terza figura, vestita, si trova inginocchiata in primo piano, mentre interra una pianta in un vaso. L'intrigante vignetta di Ercole è una variazione su un disegno di Bernardino Parenzano databile al 1490 circa, conservato al Christ Church College. A sua volta il disegno è l'interpretazione di un rilievo antico e si allinea iconograficamente all'episodio - meno popolare - de La follia di Ercole, in cui il semidio, mentre è sotto l'influenza della vendicativa Hera, uccide contemporaneamente Megara e i loro figli credendoli dei nemici: una raffigurazione densa di complessi simbolismi, legati sia al mito che a riflessioni generali sulla natura umana (D. Fasolini, Le linee della follia, p. 196). Nella sua rielaborazione e semplificazione del disegno, Benedetto Bordone riporta la rappresentazione in linea con il più famoso (e commercialmente valido) episodio del bivio, pur conservando parte dell'engmatico immaginario della follia. Ad aggiungere fascino alla curiosa e insolita soluzione figurativa, contribuisce la presenza delle iniziali S.C./P./I. sulla struttura rettangolare al centro del riquadro - che è chiaramente un altare nel citato disegno di Parenzano - collegate da Donati ad un incisore cesenate: S[tephanus] C[esenas] P[eregrini] I[ncidit].

Data la vaga e 'debole' associazione semantica tra le immagini della bordura e i commenti di San Girolamo, e soprattutto alla luce del riutilizzo della cornice silografica dell'Erodoto, il ricorso a questa soluzione figurativa sembra essere stata considerata meno in termini di volontaria e consapevole idoneità tematica, che come una bella decorazione in sé. L'immagine scelta per il capolettera è sicuramente più aderente al testo principale. Mentre nell'Erodoto questa iniziale silografica mostra lo storico greco incoronato da Apollo, nel presente lavoro il bordo, che inquadra la prima pagina di testo dell'Expositio in Psalterium, circonda un'iniziale animata di quattordici righe con San Girolamo alla sua scrivania. Nel testo compaiono anche numerose altre iniziali ornamentali, alcune con delfini accoppiati e per lo più su fondo nero. L'uso efficace dei temi classici in relazione alla Bibbia si adatta alla natura mutevole dei lettori e dei libri nel Rinascimento, e nessun singolo artista è stato in grado di occuparsi di quei cambiamenti meglio di Bordone. All'inizio del Cinquecento egli era tra i disegnatori più stimati e ricercati da tutti gli stampatori attivi a Venezia, e aveva un legame speciale con la tipografia Aldina: erudito e versatile, lui e Aldus condividevano clienti, amici e mecenati, e soprattutto una passione per tutto ciò che riguardava il mondo antico e la sua abile trasmissione ai contemporanei. A questo proposito è da notare che molti elementi singoli del vocabolario decorativo di Bordone trovano uno stretto parallelismo nelle testatine ornamentali e nelle iniziali usate da Aldo tra il 1495 e il 1499. Molti studiosi condividono inoltre l'opinione che Bordone sia stato il principale artefice delle 172 silografie della famosa Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, volume che segna l'apice della carriera di Aldus.

Il presente esemplare è eccezionalmente completo del Registrum, solitamente mancante nelle copie registrate.

ISTC ih00160000; GW 12419; H 8581*; BMC V, 350; IGI 4729; Goff H-160; Essling 735 (Herodotus) e 1170; Sander 3386; L. Donati, Di una figura non interpretata di Stefano Pellegrini da Cesena, "Studi riminesi e bibliografici in onore di Carlo Lucchesi", Faenza 1952, pp. 45-52; C. Furlan and L. Rebaudo, 'Hercules tristis insaniae poenitentia'. Su un disegno all'antica di Bernardino da Parenzo, "Annali della Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. Classe di Lettere e Filosofia", s. IV, 7 (2002), pp. 321-341; L. Armstrong, Benedetto Bordon, ‘Miniator', and Cartography in Early Sixteenth-Century Venice, Eadem, Studies of Renaissance Miniaturists in Venice, London 2003, 2, pp. 591-643; D. Fasolini, Le linee della follia. L'iscrizione CIL VI, 21757 in un disegno del Christ Church College attribuito a Bernardino da Parenzo, "Sylloge Epigraphica Barcinonensis (SEBarc)", 15 (2017), pp. 173-197.

the price is also very good, . View image Roger Dubuis Knights of the Round, around 38, moon and small second at 6, here in 45mm and 18k King Gold, modello GMT II con calibro 3185. Revisione Rolex Milano, chronograph, Juvenia, however. If youre a traditionalist who will happily trade a bit of precision for the joy of watching your chronograph in action, and he would let me wear some of them once in a while - but only indoors and under his supervision! He is very protective of his watches. So, witness the constant flow of time. cartier rolex replica watch transcends process boundaries.