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Illustrated with engravings by Vignola and woodcuts by Danti

Vignola, Giacomo Barozzi, called (1507-1573).

Le due regole della prospettiva pratica di M. Iacomo Barozzi da Vignola. Con i comentarij del R.P.M. Egnatio Danti dell'ordine de Predicatori. Matematico dello Studio di Bologna .

Vignola, Giacomo Barozzi, called (1507-1573). Le due regole della prospettiva pratica di M. Iacomo Barozzi da Vignola. Con i comentarij del R.P.M. Egnatio Danti dell'ordine de Predicatori. Matematico dello Studio di Bologna . Rome, Francesco Zannetti, 1583.

Folio (358x242 mm). Collation: +6, A-T4. [12], 145, [7] pages. Complete with the final blank leaf T4. Vignola's text in large roman type, Egnazio Danti's commentary in italic and smaller roman type. Engraved architectural title-page signed by Cherubino Alberti, including coat of arms of the dedicatee Giacomo Buoncompagni, and in the centre a bust all'antica of Vignola. Woodcut printer's device on fol. T3v. Twenty-nine engravings by Vignola, of which eight are full-page (one dated to 1562); 120 woodcut diagrams, including one repetition and one full-page block, by Danti. Headpiece with a city view on fol. N1r. Decorated woodcut initials. Slightly later vellum over boards made with older, re-used parchment. Traces of ties. Spine with four raised bands. A very good, full-margined copy, none of the notes or illustrations have been trimmed. Some marginal foxing, a few leaves slightly browned, large stain on the last blank leaf. A marginal note on fol. A1r explaining the typographic distinction between Vignola's and Danti's texts. Contemporary marginal and interlinear annotations by a single hand, which corrects and integrates the printed text: particularly interesting and extensive are the notes on pp. 119, 121, and 123. Small old stamp on the title-page only partially readable.

$ 9,500

First edition of one of the most celebrated Renaissance treatises on perspective, mainly directed at the workshops of architects and painters: a ‘modern classic' which would serve as a model of the perspective manual for two centuries. The work was edited posthumously by the Dominican mathematician Egnatio Danti (1536-1586), who based his editorial work on a copy of Vignola's manuscript owned by the Florentine Niccolò Gaddi (National Library in Florence, MS. Magl. XVII.18). Further, Danti supplemented the text with his lengthy commentary, which is three times longer than the original text and provides a mathematical demonstration of Vignola's rules and procedures. This large folio volume is rightly famous for its marvelous illustrative apparatus, and above all for the combination of two different illustration techniques, woodcuts and copperplate engravings, which are occasionally printed on the same page. The woodblocks were designed and cut by Danti himself, and some woodcuts are a re-use of those printed in Danti's translation of Euclid's Optics, published in 1573. Vignola's son Giacinto supplied the twenty-nine copperplates to illustrate the text, which his father had already engraved before his death. Only two engravings were not supervised by Vignola: the copperplate illustrating the famous perspective instrument called Prospettografo, executed after a schizzo by Vignola, and that showing the loggia painted by Tommaso Laureti in Bologna. The work was reprinted at least ten times over the following two centuries.

Mortimer Italian 538; Berlin Katalog 4695; Cicognara 810; Fowler 386; Riccardi I, 87; Vagnetti, EIIb8; F. Fiorani, “Danti Edits Vignola: The Formation of a Modern Classic on Perspective”, L. Massey, The Treatise on Perspective: Published and Unpublished, New Haven-London 2003, pp. 127-159.

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